Newsletter November 2016

International artist in residence announced

"The future is already here? It is just not evenly distributed" byTaro Shinoda for 20th Sydney Biennale 2016. , (Photo Credit: Artist)

 

In partnership with Tobias Berger, Head of Art, Tai Kwun Centre for Heritage and Art, Hong Kong, McCahon House is pleased to announce Taro Shinoda as the recipient of the inaugural international artist in residence. Taro Shinoda will take up his three-months residency in spring 2017. 

 
Taro Shinoda (1964) is based in Tokyo where he was born. His practice reflects his deep consideration of nature, humanity, philosophy and science and engages in a highly conceptual and experimental artistic process that traverses video, sculpture, installation, performance, painting and photography. Taro Shinoda’s work evidences a sensory relationship with nature and the intersection between art and science in the natural world. His work is universal in its reach and he has a significant international profile. Shinoda’s application conveyed his interest in connecting with Maori in much the same spirit as he has already done with Aboriginal communities leading up to his work for the 20th Sydney Biennale: "The Future is already here? It’s just not evenly distributed". 

This upcoming residency is made possible with the generous support from the Lim family through The Spreading Tree Trust.  It is planned that future residencies will be generated through partnerships with international institutions in other major regions of the world. The McCahon House Trust will also continue to offer three residency opportunities each year to outstanding New Zealand artists.

 

Recent event - Anne McCahon's exhibition opening



Opening night. (From Left Linda Tyler, Jessica Douglas, Andrew Clifford, Victoria Carr, Robby Newsome and Diane Blomfield.

 

Anne McCahon's exhibition - "A Table of One's Own - The Creative Life of Anne McCahon" was unveiled to the public last Saturday (19 November) at Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery.  The opening received over 100 attendees and among them were many family members. Victoria Carr (daughter of Anne and Colin McCahon) gave a lovely speech and led a waiata. Victoria said: " I think dad (Colin McCahon) would be really proud of her."

 

The exhibition is on now till 12 February 2017.

 
 

Chance to spend the night with McCahon paintings




Taiwanese artist Lee Mingwei brought his participatory projects to Auckland Art Gallery. Lee’s projects involve varying degrees of participation from gallery visitors that occur before, during and after the exhibition.  Mending, letter writing, sleeping and receiving the gift of song are just some of the ways you can experience the show. 

The Sleeping Project  particularly caught our attention. It is a ballot system where one puts their name in a box from which the gallery will select five lucky participants to spend the night at the gallery inside Lee Mingwei's exhibition. A gallery staff member will serve as the host for the night. Adding another dimension to the unique over night experience is the the chance to spend the night with works from the collection including a series of paintings by Colin McCahon.

More information about the exhibition.


Lee Mingwei and His Relations: The Art of Participation
Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tamaki
General admission $12.50
Children 12 & under FREE
5 Nov 2016 – 19 Mar 2017. 

 


 

Artist in residence blessing the kauri trees




When you visit the McCahon House Museum this spring/summer, you may notice some of the kauri trees have been given a "makeover".

This is the result of an Agnihotra Homa performed by the current artist in residence - Sarah Smuts-Kennedy.  Agnihotra is a Vedic fire procedure that has been used in this instance to work with the kauri trees which are suffering from Kauri Die Back.  Every sunrise and sunset during her residency, Sarah performed Agnihotra. She also performed daily a one-hour procedure and mantra called Om Tryambakam which expanded to four hours on both the full and new moons. Dried organic cow dung and ghee was burnt during these procedures in an inverted copper pyramid. The residual ash was then mixed with ghee and clay to form a tree paste which has been applied to six kauri trees on site. The artist said the process and duration of the project gave her an experiential way to contemplate ideas of service and devotion in relation to McCahon's exploration of Faith.

 

Alumni artists' exhibitions


Ben Cauchi
The Waters of Lethe
Brett McDowell Gallery, Dunedin
From 1 Nov

Ruth Buchanan
The Actual & its Document
Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth
10 Sept - 4 Dec

Fiona Pardington (Group Show)
Life inside an Image
MUMA, Melbourne
1 Oct - 10 Dec

Louise Menzies (Group Show)
Potentially Yours, The Coming Community
Artspace, Auckland
10 Nov - 22 Dec

Ruth Buchanan (Group Show)
Bad Visual Systems
Adam Art Gallery, Wellington
2 Oct - 22 Dec

Richard Lewer (Group Show)
Sappers & Shrapnel: Contemporary Art and the Art of the Trenches
Art Gallery of South Australia, Brisbane
11 Nov - 29 Jan
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